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$12 million bridge replacement project begins soon in southeast Colorado Springs

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KRDO) -- Workers are preparing to replace a nearly 50-year-old bridge across Spring Creek on Airport Road, just west of the Airport-Academy Boulevard intersection.

The bridge is showing signs of age, has no sidewalks and is vulnerable to flooding from the creek below.

Work is scheduled to start in December to add sidewalks on both sides of the bridge, an area that has a lot of pedestrian traffic and where people are often forced to walk in the road to get across the bridge.

The creek occasionally overflows on the road above because it can't handle the capacity from major floods, so the project will include deepening the creek by several feet and adding drop structures to reduce the risk of flash flooding and erosion.

Aaron Egbert, the city's senior engineer, said that half of the project involves finding and relocating various utility lines in the area -- including gas, sewer and water lines owned by Colorado Springs Utilities.

That process has already begun. Members of a survey crew in the area Wednesday, however, said it was unable to find other utility lines believed to exist there.

The project also will require the temporary closing of Airport Road at the Marjorie Lee Drive intersection, starting in December. Egbert said it's unclear how long that closure will last, but it won't affect access to nearby Fire Station 8, a Family Dollar store and the Korean Baptist Church.

The project's estimated cost is $12 million, financed by revenue from the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority sales tax.

Egbert said all phases of the project, from start to finish, could take as long as two years to complete.

The city has more than 400 bridges, he said, and around 100 are on a priority list for repair or replacement. However, the city has enough funding for four bridge projects annually.

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Scott Harrison

Scott is a reporter for KRDO. Learn more about Scott here.

Comments

8 Comments

  1. “Aaron Egbert, the city’s senior engineer, said that half of the project involves finding and relocating various utility lines in the area — including gas, sewer and water lines owned by Colorado Springs Utilities. That process has already begun. Members of a survey crew in the area Wednesday, however, said it was unable to find other utility lines believed to exist there.”
    .
    Some of those utilities have probably been there since before they started mapping the locations. Prepare for unplanned outages in that area…

    1. Yeah, good thing the city planned this out when they drew their citie’s CAD maps of where the utility lines were placed. Good to know that our city never cuts corners and always dots their i’s and crosses their t’s. No wonder they are projecting 2 years to complete the project.

      Question, Does that 2 years count the 1-2 years the city leaves under construction signs, cones, etc., on the completed street? Or is that not included in the total.

      400 registered bridges and 100 of them need attention according to government regulators. Good to know that rather than these government regulators fining the city for having a 1:4 ratio of bad bridges needing repair, only the people of the community suffer. Even better to know that the cities path to correct this problem is by fixing approximately 4 bridges a year. So assuming the city doesn’t add more bridges and none of the other 300 fall below the regulator’s line, it should only take the city of Colorado Springs 25 YEARS to fix the bridges at the rate they stated.

      Go team, thanks for being there for your constituents. We’re on the 25+ year plan to fixing this problem. When government leadership is this inept, does it make anyone else wonder why the world is in the state it is in currently? Thanks two-party system.

      1. Oops, I seen an error in my initial mathematics. It each bridge is estimated to take 1-2 years than the 25+ year plan could actually take 25-50+ years. Its good to have controllable longevity in your career. It’s even better to not be expected to strive to excel. At least that is what is being shown through the Cities actions on resolving this problem.

  2. 12 Million? I don’t see it. But I do see pockets lined with cash!!!
    Must be fun to spend other peoples money freely!

  3. This city now has money to burn. Does this bridge really require a $12 million replacement just to add some unused sidewalks?

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