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CSPD responding to more crashes in 2019, says traffic sergeant

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CSPD's Major Crash Team investigates a crash after a truck hit a woman crossing Cimarron bridge in Colorado Springs.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - A traffic sergeant for the Colorado Springs Police Department says they're getting more emergency calls for crashes in the city this year.

In a podcast by the City of Colorado Springs, Sergeant Jim Stinson with CSPD's Major Crash Team said people have to drive more responsibly as a community.

"This isn't a government problem, it's not a police officer problem, it's a community problem and so we have to hold ourselves accountable," Stinson said in the podcast. "If you drive defensively, you can avoid a lot of these wrecks."

The Major Crash Team has received 105 emergency calls to respond to crashes, surpassing last year's 104 calls.

Sergeant Stinson said 2018 broke records for the city with 48 traffic fatalities. So far in 2019, the city has had 38 deadly crashes. Five of those happened in less than a month since October.

"We're traditionally second in the state with fatal numbers each year behind Denver," Stinson said to listeners. "And El Paso County is traditionally the lead county in fatalities."

Stinson advises motorists to pay attention to the roads and avoid getting distracted. He says speed is usually the main factor in fatal crashes, but driving under the influence and distracted driving are other significant contributors.

Colorado Springs / Crime / Local News / Traffic

Zachary Aedo

Comments

7 Comments

  1. “This isn’t a government problem, it’s not a police officer problem, it’s a community problem and so we have to hold ourselves accountable,” Stinson said in the podcast. “If you drive defensively, you can avoid a lot of these wrecks.”

    You are correct Sgt. Stinson, this is a systemic problem. The causality of the lack of LEO’s and the poor road conditions are just contributing factors to what exacerbates the main problem. Why would the populace hold themselves accountable when the city is unwilling to hold themselves accountable for the contributing factors that make this such a un-managed and unmitigated problem? Sgt. Stinson, you know as well as anyone if you allow a problem like traffic to continue to go unchecked or as we have here, just very poorly managed, you create a wound that becomes septic. If you do not treat the wound it will only get worse. These poor management skills have existed in CSPD for at least 20 years so far and it is still not getting better. In fact with Sgt. Stinson’s PSA, it looks like there is no plans of fixing it anytime soon, and that really was not a surprise. CSPD will continue to point their inadequacies back on to the populace as to why they cannot enforce laws that the populace fails to follow.
    Ultimately, this is why unenforceable traffic cameras are being installed, because the city is tired of CSPD’s excuses, but the city will not do what needs to be done as well. the CITY needs to trim CSPD’s top of the Bonsai Tree, then the City needs to reevaluate how much additional money they will need to supply the populace with the # of LEO’s neeed for a populace our size. Then they need to hire that many more entry level officers.
    The solution is simple, the problem is the elected personnel in power will not consider this because of the Good’Ol’Boy system that exists throughout their command staff, and that is where the bulk of the cuts need to occur.

  2. you want to fix the problem? Full and complete transparency to the populace and in the voice of former President Ronald Reagan, “Mayor Suthers, Sheriff Bill Elder, and Chief Vince Niski, Tear, down, this BLUE WALL!!!”

    1. That will never happen because then government would have to classify it as a right instead of a privilege. Rights cannot be taken away like they can currently, and your rights can’t have conditional requirements like “expressed consent”. It would be “great”, but our government doesn’t do “great”, only “meh good e’nuff.”

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